Wednesday, October 3, 2012

Leadership Tips to Start In A New Job

Today, leaders are moving into new roles more frequently than ever before.

Often new leaders want to understand where to start, particularly if part of their new leadership role if to form a new organization.
It all starts with Planning and Prioritization.The first thing to do is to create your 30, 60 and 90 days action plan.

The first 30 days: Get Exposure
During the first 30 days, you should spend most of your time understanding the organization and defining the value that you will bring to the team (both your immediate team and the organization as a whole).
You want to find the answers to these questions:
- How does the organization operate?
- How does the business make money?
- What is the business model? Products? Services?
- Who are the customers?
- Who is the competition?
- What is the regulatory environment?
In order to get a realistic picture don't just stay inside your office reading a bunch of powerpoint presentations and financial statements. You must expose yourself and meet people. Talk to the employees, peers, business partners and internal clients.

The first 60 days: Attract The Right Talent
I was recently in Los Angeles attending a Women Leaders breakfast where each participant received a copy of "Connecting My Dots". One of the new female leaders asked me where I find the time for mentoring given that I have a very demanding job. I told her that the answer was very simple- I manage a high performing team !
One of the most important roles of a leader is to attract a right talent and then create a high performing team. On my next post, I will provide 5 Tips that will guide through the process of creating a high performing team.

The first 90 days: Develop a Plan and Start Executing

Saturday, July 21, 2012

Managing risk with Ilieva Ageenko of Bank of America | Hispanic Executive

Sharing my interview with the Hispanic Executive magazine about the importance of of having Role Models for Women in Quantitative Finance and Analytics.

Managing risk with Ilieva Ageenko of Bank of America | Hispanic Executive

Friday, July 20, 2012

How Women in High Visible Jobs Manage Competing Priorities?

As the news that Marissa Mayer the new CEO of Yahoo is expecting a child landed on the front page of the CIO Magazine it propelled the never ending debate around the popular question: Can Women Have it All?

Her announcement and the subsequent debate took place just few weeks after another female in a high office chair Anne-Marie Slaughter, former director of policy planning at the State Department, wrote about the challenges of managing family and work in a widely read Atlantic magazine cover story titled "Why Women Still Can't Have it All."

A key message in my book “Connecting My Dots” from numerous successful women in leadership roles is that to find a BALANCE (or to be more practice to find an ALIGNMEMT) among career , family and personal goals women need to plan, set priorities and make trade-offs alone the way.

Often when we hear about work – life balance, we think that we need to equally distribute the weights across career, family and personal priorities.

Guess What? This is a Big Mistake?

You need to think in terms of an optimization problem where you are forced to align the weight between priorities to balance the total weight of Your “Priority Wheel” - a tool for alignment of your career and family priorities.
In addition, your personal values and preferences as well as what stage of your life you are in at that moment are a critical consideration on how you decide to assign the weights among priorities in the “Priority Wheel”.

I believe and I know from personal experience as a bank executive who raised two children in a new country that professional women can have it all but not always at the same time. What do we have at any given time fluctuates and depends on what lifestage we are in and the trade off we are willing to make. Sometime career has the most weight on the “Priority Wheel” other times your children.

Friday, July 6, 2012

Advice for Women in Quantitative Finance

In my new role as a Quantitative Risk Technology executive, I continue to operate in a professional field with few women in leadership roles.

Quantitative Finance is a multidisciplinary field where math, science, technology and finance come together. It is the sweet spot of STEM (science, technology, engineering and math). Quantitative Finance is one of the most exciting and fast growing areas of Risk Management and Capital Markets however there is a lack of women role models in leadership positions.

For those who either have followed my blogs before or have met me at women forums you know that we see a serious lack of women and more so women in leadership positions in STEM careers. I have been a champion of attracting young women into STEM careers for quite some time and have taken this problem to the Capitol Hill.
More recently I had the opportunity to address this problem during an interview with the Hispanic Executive magazine.

When I first decided to switch from the emerging technologies field to Quantitative Finance and Analytics, I was looking for a complex leadership role in the interception of quant, technology and business. Then right after I walked into this role I spotted and already familiar trend – there is lack of quant women in leadership positions. Still today, after numerous efforts to hire a quant woman, all my direct reports are men. This is why one of my main goals as a Quant Risk Executive is to provide a role model to other women who want to follow this career path.

Last year, I visited the Carnegie Mellon Computational Finance program to talk to the students about quantitative technology positions in financial services. I like their program because in addition to the rigorous quantitative curriculum students get exposure to business classes and I was also very pleased to see a good number of young females pursuing degrees in Mathematical Finance and Computational Finance. Unfortunately, several female students were looking for quant research positions and very few applied to our roles.

The first step is to create a pipeline of young women. The second step is to help them to develop the soft skills that are needed to advance to a leadership role Helping young quant females to help them develop soft business skills it is very important. First because these skills will help not only to advance in their careers in Corporate America but also because a deeper understanding of the business will help them to develop models that take into account common sense or using a more quantitative jargon models that will take into account the volatility of the human decision making process.

Finally, for those women in quantitative fields that are looking to develop softer skills that will complement their quantitative skills, here are some tips that require additional attention and perhaps training and development:

- A good business decision make on time is better than a perfect decision make later.
- Perfection is a relative term. Look for an efficient solution (efficient in this context could be a result of cost, time and resources).
- What you do is as important as How you do it.
- Don’t be afraid to say that you are not 100% sure on your answer. But always ask for an opportunity to follow up with the right answer.
- Learn to explain problems in business terms and to deal with uncertainty.

Thursday, December 30, 2010

Inspiring Women Like You

Yesterday, my husband and I had dinner at a friend’s house and I brought them a copy of my book “Connecting My Dots” as a gift. As soon as we opened a bottle of red wine I heard the already familiar question: What motivated you to write the book?

Those that have read Connecting My Dots already know the answer. My motivation for writing the book was to inspire young women to balance their priorities and achieve multidimensional success. The Five Leadership Lessons from the book show them examples on how to connect their different dots in a Priority Wheel to achieve success in their own terms.

The best way to summarize the impact of my mentoring lessons is to say that nothing have been more rewarding to me as an author and mentor than to hear personal stories directly from many women who were inspire by my book to achieve their goals.

I want to share their stories of personal success hoping that YOU too will be inspired by their resolutions. I selected five stories from women who had different goals and dreams.

By mentioning these women here I hope that their stories will inspire many other women to achieve their goals.

1- Having a Baby: This young professional woman overcame her fears of having a baby and learned to be a mom while at the same time she continues to advance in her professional career as a financial analyst.

2- Becoming an Author: This season executive woman was inspired to write and publish two books while she continues to have a very successful career as a bank executive. Check her first book Person of Interest currently available at

3- Opening a Business: This young woman who is a mother of two boys decided to follow her longtime dream to open her on boutique while learning to balance priorities between business and family. Check her store Sanaryalba

4- Playing Sports: Looking after my own example of overcoming personal fears, a mother of two decided break with her indecision and started playing tennis in sport club.

5- Losing Weight: A mother of two boys and a very athletic woman could not keep her weight down. After reading my last article about 2010 resolution she finally was inspired to create her own personalized plan and achieved her goals.

Just like these women have done you too can achieve your goals. Use the Priority Wheel and empower yourself to achieve Multidimensional Success on Your Own Terms!

Happy New Year!